Hurricane Florence Information

By Andrew Wigger - awigger@newberryobserver.com
A projection of the earliest reasonable arrival time of Tropical-Storm-Force winds. - Courtesy photo

NEWBERRY — As of Tuesday morning, there are four scenarios that are being planned for when it comes to Hurricane Florence from the South Carolina Emergency Management Division.

The first scenario involves Florence turning north/northeast and passes off-shore. In this scenario there will be strong rip currents, beach erosion, coastal flooding and high waves.

The second scenario involves Florence making landfall in southern or central North Carolina. In this scenario there will be minor storm surge impacts in Horry/Georgetown, hurricane and or tropical storm force winds along Horry/Georgetown coast, tropical storm force winds in the northern conglomerate, potential heavy rain and flooding in the northern conglomerate and river flooding.

The third scenario has Florence making landfall in the northern conglomerate. This scenario will see significant storm surge in Horry/Georgetown, ten plus feet possible along and north of landfall location, hurricane force winds in the northern conglomerate, potential statewide tropical storm force winds, tornado threat in northeastern South Carolina, heavy rain and flash flooding and river flooding.

The fourth scenario has Florence making landfall in the southern and central conglomerate (which includes Newberry County). This scenario will see significant storm surge along the entire coast, with ten plus feet possible along the north and landfall location, hurricane force winds possible in the southern, central and northern conglomerate, statewide tropical storm force winds, statewide heavy rain and flooding, statewide tornado threat.

The S.C. Emergency Management Division gave key messages for Hurricane Florence as well.

A life-threatening storm surge is likely along portions of the coastlines of South Carolina, North Carolina and Virginia, and a Storm Surge Watch has been issued for a portion of this area. All residents from S.C. into the mid-Atlantic region should ensure they have their hurricane plan in place, and follow any advice given by local officials.

Life-threatening freshwater flooding is likely from a prolonged and exceptionally heavy rainfall even, which may extend inland over the Carolinas and Mid Atlantic for hundreds of miles as Florence is suspected to slow down as it approaches the coast and moves inland.

Damaging hurricane-force winds are likely along portions of the coasts of South Carolina and North Carolina, and a Hurricane Watch has been issued for a part of this area. Damaging winds could also spread well inland into portions of the Carolinas and Virginia.

Large swells affecting Bermuda and portions of the U.S. East Coast will continue this week, resulting in life-threatening surf and rip currents.

Tommy Long, emergency service coordinator for Newberry County, advises all residents to visit scemd.org, and download their app, SC Emergency Manager. Long said this is the best way to stay up to date.

A projection of the earliest reasonable arrival time of Tropical-Storm-Force winds.
https://www.newberryobserver.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/web1_LatestBriefing-2-07.jpgA projection of the earliest reasonable arrival time of Tropical-Storm-Force winds. Courtesy photo
Four possible scenarios for what Florence will do

By Andrew Wigger

awigger@newberryobserver.com

Reach Andrew Wigger at 803-276-0625 ext. 1867 or on Twitter @TheNBOnews.

Reach Andrew Wigger at 803-276-0625 ext. 1867 or on Twitter @TheNBOnews.