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Last updated: December 06. 2013 12:36AM - 596 Views

Photo submittedMike Turner began growing this poinsettia in 2005 and didn't throw it out, simply to see if it would bloom again the next year. Each summer, he would put it under a 100-year-old cedar tree where it could get the benefits of being outdoors, yet remain sheltered. It began to grow. In 2007, he transplanted it the first time to a larger pot and it bloomed twice — once in July and again in December. Turner transplanted it again in 2009 and it has continued to grow. He said this summer was the first time it didn't bloom twice, a fact he attributed to the heavy rains in July. At its girth, the poinsettia is now over 56 inches in circumference and a little over four feet tall.
Photo submittedMike Turner began growing this poinsettia in 2005 and didn't throw it out, simply to see if it would bloom again the next year. Each summer, he would put it under a 100-year-old cedar tree where it could get the benefits of being outdoors, yet remain sheltered. It began to grow. In 2007, he transplanted it the first time to a larger pot and it bloomed twice — once in July and again in December. Turner transplanted it again in 2009 and it has continued to grow. He said this summer was the first time it didn't bloom twice, a fact he attributed to the heavy rains in July. At its girth, the poinsettia is now over 56 inches in circumference and a little over four feet tall.
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Mike Turner began growing this poinsettia in 2005 and didn’t throw it out, simply to see if it would bloom again the next year. Each summer, he would put it under a 100-year-old cedar tree where it could get the benefits of being outdoors, yet remain sheltered. It began to grow. In 2007, he transplanted it the first time to a larger pot and it bloomed twice — once in July and again in December. Turner transplanted it again in 2009 and it has continued to grow. He said this summer was the first time it didn’t bloom twice, a fact he attributed to the heavy rains in July. At its girth, the poinsettia is now over 56 inches in circumference and a little over four feet tall.


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